John Mitchell, Jr. at Bethel

January 25, 1902

Summary

John Mitchell, Jr., gives a powerful speech drawing on his intense experiences of oppression growing up, gaining support and respect on behalf of the black community.

Transcription

The doughty editor of the Richmond Planet discourses eloquently upon Judge Lynch and his victims. Before an overflowing and appreciative audience- coming attractions.

John Mitchell Jr., Esq., Editor of the “Richmond Planet,” held forth on last Tuesday before the famous Bethel Literary Society at Lincoln Memorial Temple in a masterly and eloquent address on “Judge Lynch and His Victims.” It was manifest from the very beginning of his remarks that Mr. Mitchell had the earnest and sympathetic attention of an audience, which more than filled the church, not only because the subject was of such moment, but because they knew that the speaker had come from the hot-bed of oppression and prejudice, and yet had stood it for years in fearless defense on the right. His remarks were rich in illustrating and drawing from a varied experience. Statistics were furnished as to material and intellectual progress of the Negro in the South, the same being considered the real cause of race animosity. Personal bravery on the part of Negroes, wronged or attacked, and race unity were urged as being essential to respect and success.
A bright and entertaining discussion was participated in by Messrs Lewis H. Douglass, Jno. W. Cromwell, L.M. Hershaw, R.S. Smith, and M.J. Gordon. Mrs. Julia Wormley McAdoo recited selections from Eugene Field in such a brilliant manner as to receive vociferous applause.
Mr. Wm. H. Joiner, 1st Vice-Pres., presided in the absence of Mr. F. L. Cardoza, Jr., President, who is detained at home because of illness in his family.
About this article

Location on Page

Upper Right Quadrant

Contributed By

Brooke Royer

Citation

“ John Mitchell, Jr. at Bethel,” Black Virginia: The Richmond Planet, 1894-1909, accessed January 30, 2023, https://blackvirginia.richmond.edu/items/show/61.