Fashion Hints for the Ladies: “Warm Weather Attire”

August 6, 1898

Summary

A newly installed fashion column provides new ways to keep women from suffering heatstroke due to their clothes in the summertime.

Transcription

Thin apparel for the hottest of hot seasons.

How to keep cool is a problem which perplexes many women who suffer intensely from warm weather, yet do not wish to spend their summer in the seclusion of their bedroom and a lawn wrapper. Thin underwear, if cambric or lawn, if of course an understood thing, and open work corsets, the shorter the better, should be adopted, as thereby much discomfort is escaped. The variety known as the cycling or riding corset is hardly more than a girdle and is comparatively cool. So much transparent fabric is worn this summer that there are sheer dimities without number to choose from, and thin grenadines also, but if these are still too thick white or cream dotted wash net such as is used for ties and fichus will be found entirely satisfactory. It must be made without a lining, of course, and may be prettily shirred and gathered. A silk underdress is not at all requisite and adds much to the heat of the costume, beneath which a pretty muslin petticoat and corset cover will have an equally good effect. Of course, such a gown can only be worn in the house, as transparent costumes are in the worst taste for the street, even in the country. These dresses of cotton net are cooler than those of silk, which require silk beneath and have the additional advantage of laundering to perfection.

The bathing suit illustrated is of white serge. The trousers are plain, and the skirt is edged with three bands of red braid. Red braid and anchors decorate the tunic, which is full and has a girdle of red silk. The short-puffed sleeves are gathered into a cuff. A white cap and white shoes are worn.

Judic Chollet.
About this article

Location on Page

Upper Left Quadrant

Topic

Contributed By

Cali Hughes

Citation

“Fashion Hints for the Ladies: “Warm Weather Attire”,” Black Virginia: The Richmond Planet, 1894-1909, accessed April 20, 2018, https://blackvirginia.richmond.edu/items/show/1521.