The Effect in the South

August 25, 1894

Summary

With the passage of the tariff bill, the sugar industry in New Orleans is bracing for the worst.

Transcription

We have repeatedly declared that it was to the interest of this section to vote the Republican ticket, and thereby uphold and guarantee the supremacy of Republican principles.
Republican tariff bill which Bears the name McKinley was repealed last week and a Democratic tariff Bill takes its place.
One would have thought that a cry of exultation would from one section of the country to the other, but the contrary is true.
Read the following telegraphic account from New Orleans. the effect of the fall of Richmond, the surrender of Lee could not have been better portrayed than was the feeling which follow the passage of the Democratic tariff bill.
Here it is:

“The passage of the Wilson tariff bill has thrown a damper on Commercial dealing in New Orleans. At least two-thirds of her population looked to the sugar industry, directly or indirectly, for support and any negotiations That are unfavorable to sugar have a decidedly bad effect on all Commerce. The Sugar Exchange yesterday was in a turmoil, the members declaring that the industry would be ruined by adverse legislation, that 3 sugar will close down 19 out of 20 sugar plantations in this State, and New Orleans will practically die a commercial death. Great Hopes are entertained by New Orleans Merchants that the free sugar amendments will not become a law and many still cling to the forlorn hope that the Bounty for the crop of 1894 will be paid, but the majority have given up all hopes of getting even A fractional part of this bounty.”
When will the South consider its pocket rather than its prejudices when election time comes around?
See who can answer that question will name the day that is first radical march in the direction of prosperity.
About this article

Location on Page

Upper Right Quadrant

Contributed By

Carlos Serrano

Citation

“The Effect in the South,” Black Virginia: The Richmond Planet, 1894-1909, accessed October 27, 2020, https://blackvirginia.richmond.edu/items/show/1497.