Lynching In Louisiana

April 20, 1907

Summary

After a black man choked a white girl to death, a mob goes to the prison. Someone thought they saw a man escape the prison, shots were fired and 7 people were injured.

Transcription

Lynching In Louisiana
The Mob Leaders Wounded.- One Dead.
New Orleans, April 15.- Five white men and two Negroes were shot, two of them fatality, in a shooting affray and attempted lynching at Bunkle, La., last night. The affair is somewhat mixed, and the exact truth is not yet fully known.
Saturday a Negro named Charles Strauss, a railroad hand, criminally assaulted Mrs. Edward Norris, a white woman at Haasville, about 7 miles west of Bunkie. He attempted to cut her throat, but his knife was not sharp enough and he choked her into insensibility. He was captured and taken to Bunkie, where he was confined in the parish jail.
Source Of Shooting Unknown
In the meanwhile two other Negroes were locked up in the jail, Isom and Louis Robertson, charged with having shot and fatally wounded another Negro in a gambling game. Late last night a small mob went to Bunkie jail, but whether to lynch Strauss or the two Robertsons is not known. There was a shout that the Negro prisoners were escaping and a fusillade of twenty or more shots followed. It was then found that five members of the mob had been shot.
All are seriously wounded, but only John Dorman a sawmill owner is fatally injured. A Negro, E. Madson was shot through the lungs and fatally wounded, and another Negro was shot. It is believed that mob fired recklessly in the darkness and shot five of its members, although those who were engaged in the affair aver fired no shots and suggest that the shooting was done by friends of the Negroes. During the excitement Strauss escaped.
The wounded white men are H. V. Crutcher, H. S. Dougherty, O. Quinn, John Dorman, and C. H. Emery, the latter of Brandon, Miss.
About this article

Location on Page

Upper Left Quadrant

Contributed By

Benton Camper

Citation

“Lynching In Louisiana,” Black Virginia: The Richmond Planet, 1894-1909, accessed November 16, 2018, http://blackvirginia.richmond.edu/items/show/482.